Review
Story added:  3:00pm Wed Mar 20, 2013
Showstopping performance
Saturday 16th March, 2013 - Farnsfield Village Centre
IT isn’t every day you call at a village hall and hear a living musical legend, but it happened at Farnsfield Village Centre on Saturday when Dave Swarbrick gave a showstopping performance.

Usually known as Swarb, he is the man credited with inventing the sound of the folk rock fiddle almost 50 years ago while a young member of Fairport Convention. The sound is now associated with bands such as The Corrs and The Levellers, but Swarb got there first.

He began his musical career as a Morris musician in Coventry, playing traditional fare for dance sides before making his name with the Ian Campbell Folk Group.

He gave the near-capacity audience almost two hours of music, played with great joy, knowledge and precision, and leaning heavily on the hornpipe and gig traditions of England and Ireland.

There were several of his own compositions, Flatback Capers, Dirty Linen, and My Heart Is In New South Wales, and his triple-encore ended with the traditional Irish tune Sigh Beg Sigh Mor.

For anyone unfamiliar with his sound, he will figure on a BBC4 television programme tomorrow, The Richard Thompson BBC Four Session. It is strongly recommended — FJC.
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