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Newark Advertiser bygones include campaign to collect T-shirts for people in Angola and opening of £30,000 primary school




Among this week's Advertiser bygones include a national campaign to collect T-shirts and money for people in Angola, as well as the opening of a £30,000 primary school.

Have a read, and giggle, at our bygones below.

Branch chairman the Rector of Newark, the Rev Roger Hill, is pictured sorting the T-shirts with, left to right, churchwarden Mr Tony Yates, and church members David Oliver-Wilson and Hannah Yates.
Branch chairman the Rector of Newark, the Rev Roger Hill, is pictured sorting the T-shirts with, left to right, churchwarden Mr Tony Yates, and church members David Oliver-Wilson and Hannah Yates.

25 years ago September 6, 1996

  • The Newark branch of Christian Aid is taking part in a national campaign to collect T-shirts and money for people in Angola.

Branch chairman, the Rector of Newark, the Rev Roger Hill, is pictured above sorting the T-shirts with, left to right, churchwarden Mr Tony Yates, and church members David Oliver-Wilson and Hannah Yates.

  • One of the leaders of the real ale revolution of the early Seventies is planning a return to the town that gave him a start in the pub industry.

Mr Chris Holmes, former national chairman of the Campaign For Real Ale, hopes to transform two empty shops in Newark town centre.

Numbers four and six Appletongate, near the Barnbygate junction, now stand empty but could again become the Fox And Crown if the plans are accepted.

  • Courts should have powers to intervene if proposed later liquor licences cause problems, says Newark and Sherwood District Council.

A consultation paper has been issued by the Home Office to extend permitted hours at weekends. If the changes are agreed pubs and clubs would be allowed to stay open until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays and nightclubs and discos would be allowed to serve alcohol until 3am on Saturdays and Sundays.

  • The place to be for all self-respecting dogs on Sunday was the showground at Winthorpe for the annual show of Newark and District Canine Society.

Owners and breeders came from across Britain for the event.

50 years ago — September 11, 1971

  • A new £30,000 primary school that just opened at Winthorpe will mean less crowded classrooms for the 52 children.
Opening of Winthorpe Primary School.
Opening of Winthorpe Primary School.

Says headmaster Mr Allan Smith: “In the new building we shall have room to move without falling over each other. There will be plenty of room to display everything.”

This is one the many advantages the new building has over the old, which has served Winthorpe since 1878.

Production at Ransome Hoffmann Pollard at Newark is unlikely to be immediately affected by the management’s suspension of 70 technicians who were working to rule following a pay dispute.

Pickets were out at the factory last week.

The men will hold a factory gate meeting followed by a further meeting at premises in Newark town centre.

  • Southwell Rural District Council’s public health inspector is being frustrated in his attempts to rehouse old people who are living in ‘stinking, rotten property’, a meeting was told.

Southwell has more than its share of such property, which the council hoped to demolish as part of its slum clearance programme.

  • They are preparing for blast-off when the new night school session begins at Newark Technical College. For later this month a class for budding bagpipe players will drone into action.
  • Notts WI members are being urged to put away their knitting during meetings ­— because the clickety-click of needles distracts guest speakers.

100 years ago — September 7, 1921

  • Unemployment still gives cause for anxiety in Newark. The prospects are anything but bright for the coming winter months and the distress is made more acute by the fact benefit in a large number of cases is nearing exhaustion.

The number of men on the register at Newark Employment Exchange was 545. In addition to the men, there are 80 women and approximately the same number of juveniles.

These figures naturally show a big decrease from the high-water mark reached during the destructive coal strike but there is still too little work to go round.

  • Among the new business enterprises of Newark, one of the firms coming coming to the front rapidly is that of which Mr G. E. Rose, Cross Street, is the proprietor.

His workshops, hidden away at the rear of a coal yard, are large and capacious, and a recent visit showed workmen busily operating the sawing, planing and moulding machines (power driven).

  • The ladies committee of Southwell City Football Club are to be congratulated upon the success of the fete and gala organised and carried out by them on Lowe’s Wong.

The attractions were well patronised, crowds of people passing in and out of the field during the evening.

  • It seems the warm weather is at an end and the Trent is a trifle cooler in consequence.

But this does not deter our bathing girls from their dips. At mixed times, ladies are often in the majority and the water is fairly dotted with their caps. Pretty caps too, some trimmed with rosettes, pleats and frills.



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