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Coffee morning to be held in memory of Farndon boy who died in 2008 after a four-year battle with leukaemia


By Abigail Hunt


A coffee morning is to be held in memory of a boy who died in 2008 after a four-year battle with cancer.

Joel Picker-Spence, who lost his fight to leukaemia at the age of six, will be remembered at a Macmillan Cancer Support coffee morning at the Inn On The Green, Coddington, on Saturday, November 9.

His mother, Anne-Marie Spence, said it was important for her family to give something back to the charity, which supported her when she needed it most.

Coffee morning to be held in memory of Joel Picker-Spence. (20329228)
Coffee morning to be held in memory of Joel Picker-Spence. (20329228)

“We held a coffee morning last year as well and always do it around the date of his death,” said Anne-Marie.

“Last year we raised about £900. Macmillan helped us out when we needed it most.

“Cancer affects most people these days and it would be nice to give something back in Joel’s memory.”

Coffee morning to be held in memory of Joel Picker-Spence. (20329225)
Coffee morning to be held in memory of Joel Picker-Spence. (20329225)

If anyone would like to donate cakes or raffle prizes to Joel’s Macmillan Coffee Morning, they should contact the Inn On The Green, on Main Street, Coddington, and ask for Anne-Marie.

Joel, a pupil at Mount School, Newark, was diagnosed with leukaemia on New Year’s Day in 2005.

As part of his battle, his mother and the Advertiser launched the Join For Joel campaign to get the public to sign up to the Anthony Nolan bone marrow register.

The first of blood-testing sessions was held at Newark Hospital with a further session, organised by the Advertiser and the Anthony Nolan Trust, at Kelham Hall.

Coffee morning to be held in memory of Joel Picker-Spence. (20329230)
Coffee morning to be held in memory of Joel Picker-Spence. (20329230)

The Join For Joel campaign sawhundreds of people sign up to the register as part of the jointly-organised event.

“The Advertiser also did a massive campaign and got over 300 people to join the bone marrow register at Kelham Hall,” said Anne-Marie.

“Joel did get a bone match but it was too late. He was six when he died.”

More than 400 people attended his funeral at Newark Parish Church, with more people lining Church Street.

Thanks to the Join For Joel campaign and blood-testing sessions, it is believed 13 potentially life-saving matches were made.

During the course of the whole campaign more than 5,000 people joined the register.

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