Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Comic Tiny Tim sends personalised video to William Gladstone Church of England Primary Academy



More news, no ads

LEARN MORE


Comic Tiny Tim sent a personalised fun video to a Newark primary school that has had staff, parents and pupils in stitches.

Staff at William Gladstone Church of England Primary Academy are fans of Tiny Tim and often share his videos on their Whatsapp chat group.

Tiny Tim speaks to William Gladstone Church of England Primary Academy.
Tiny Tim speaks to William Gladstone Church of England Primary Academy.

In a time of coronavirus, Tiny Tim offers a service on his YouTube account for personal messages.

William Gladstone teaching assistant Alison Cousins hit upon the idea of Tim voicing one for them and offered some helpful scripting ideas.

Prankster Tim, an adult who speaks as a child, was only too happy to help and sent a video that was so good it was shared on the school’s Facebook page and has now attracted more than 7,000 views.

“It’s such a good video. He really put some effort in,” said Miss Cousins.

“It’s really amazing. The staff loved it and so did the parents and the children. It’s really taken off.”

In the video, Tiny Tim, aged three, nearly six, says how brilliant the school is, so good that he wants an application form to enrol.

He offers his uncle Barry to help out with the school football team, even though he’s no good, as a sweetener.

The staff have been inspired to create their own Tiny Tim-esque video, which should be available on its Facebook page today.

Exterior of William Gladstone CofE Primary Academy. 070120DD6-2. (26173172)
Exterior of William Gladstone CofE Primary Academy. 070120DD6-2. (26173172)

They voice messages from the children as to what they want to do when their lockdown is over in child-speak.

The school has around 300 pupils and every one gets a visit from staff each week to let them know that they’re missed and being thought of while they cannot be at school.

Miss Cousins said William Gladstone was a close-knit community and the children often left written messages and drawings for the visiting staff on their doorsteps or garden walls, something she described as lovely.

They also have secret code words that if uttered, earn the child reward points for when they do go back.

You can see the video here.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More