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Friends’ special garden



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Four friends earned a special award for the community garden they look after.

Mrs Glenys Brewitt (70) Mrs Mary Spowage (66) Mrs Christine Dickinson (66) and Mrs Laura Dring (77) all of Howes Court, Newark, tend the community garden at the complex.

Judges in the East Midlands in Bloom competition inspected the garden when they visited Newark.

The town entered the competition for the first time in 11 years and won a bronze certificate in the large town category.

“It is nice to know that all the hard work we put in gets recognised,” said Mrs Brewitt.

The women began tending the Howes Court garden four years ago.

“Back then there were brambles and thistles everywhere. One day I just thought I would do something about it,” said Mrs Brewitt.

The garden is now filled with a colourful array of plants. It has a bird table, bird bath, a hand-laid footpath and a sundial.

There are different coloured gravelled areas.

The judges said they had created an attractive, colourful garden.

The four gardeners hold a coffee morning every Friday to raise money for the plants they need to buy.

The women also sell home-grown Howes Court lavender bags for 25p each.

“Winning this award will spur us on and encourage us to carry on gardening,” said Mrs Spowage.

The chairman of the town council environment and leisure committee, Mrs Marika Tribe, said: “I am extremely impressed with the ladies at Howes Court.

“They are an asset to the town.”

Mrs Tribe said she was worried that Newark had not been ready to enter the competition this year after such a long break so she was pleased they had achieved the bronze award.

Much of the credit for the success was attributed to the work of the council’s environmental services manager, Mr James Radley.

Mrs Tribe appealed to gardeners and residents to come forward with ideas to help improve on their bronze rating next year and said she would like to involve as many people as possible.

“Newark has a lot of historical and cultural background and we need to decide what our speciality is and how best to go forward,” she said.



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