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Inspirational primary head teacher retires after 18 years




An inspirational primary school head teacher has retired after 18 years of educating.

Bob Hattersley, retiring head at Chuter Ede Primary School, has taken the decision to hand in his notice having never "had that Monday morning feeling".

He is known for the Together For Newark initiative led by the Newark Family of Schools (NFS) – of which he is chair – to ensure all children have access to the same life chances.

Left to right: Chuter Ede Fernwood head girl Darcy-May Laurence, 11, Emmanuel Muoka, 11, retiring headteacher Bob Hattersley, Ana-Maria Stoiof, 11, and head boy Jake Warrener, 11. 220719DC1-1 (14156115)
Left to right: Chuter Ede Fernwood head girl Darcy-May Laurence, 11, Emmanuel Muoka, 11, retiring headteacher Bob Hattersley, Ana-Maria Stoiof, 11, and head boy Jake Warrener, 11. 220719DC1-1 (14156115)

Bob's career began in 1979 where he served as a teacher in several primary schools, going on to become head at Chuter Ede's Balderton site in 2001.

He then became head at the school's Fernwood site which was built in 2012 following pupil demand and success of the existing primary school.

"I feel like I want to do different things now but I've loved my time here. It's been a very difficult decision to retire. But now I've got more opportunity to relax a bit more," said Bob.

The former head said his career has been all about the children and reflecting on their education, adding he has always tried his best to support them.

The steering Newark Family of Schools group started working together in 2012 following an activity in the community that gave a focus for what the project needed to include.

Bob added: "I'm the chair of the Newark Family of Schools, which is all about closing the gap in terms of poverty and improving the future life chances of our children – all of which will continue when I am gone.

"Within the NFS we have adopted a Newark health ambassador and a councillor comes to work with us once a week, for any child that is dealing with stress, anxiety or bereavement. The reason we do this is because this will also raise aspirations of our children, because they fell well within themselves."

The NFS feels strongly that this has to be a cohesive effort if it hopes to make a difference and develop as a community.

But despite the laying the foundationary work for the initiative and maintaining its aims, Bob has no doubt both school sites will prosper when he has left.

He said: "I also have no fears about all these initiatives carrying on when I'm gone. We've got some very talented head teachers and staff and they are all familiar with the strategies we are working on.

"I've never had that 'Monday morning feeling'. I've always been excited about what I'm doing. And I think I will miss the people the most, it's the most important thing within the job."

Throughout his notable career Bob has had the pleasure of having Linford Christie in his classroom and saw a glimpse of Princess Diana when she was passing one of his schools.

He is now planning his retirement and do some consultancy work for the county and self-employed.

Bob added: "I've loved my job, there's been so many memories that I could not pin point one as the best. There's been so much support from parents over the years who helped us go the extra mile.

"But the next thing on my list is completing Yorkshire Three Peaks challenge, raising money for the British heart foundation."

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