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Newark and Sherwood expected to see rise in covid-19 cases, warns Public Health official



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Covid-19 cases are expected to rise in Newark and Sherwood, health officials have warned.

Speaking to journalists at yesterday's coronavirus briefing, experts warned cases would rise across the whole of Nottinghamshire — including Newark and Sherwood — over January.

The rates would not only impact schools and businesses, but also NHS staff and patients.

Close up of doctor hands with protective gloves and PPE suit, showing a test device to senior patient. Review of a Rapid Antigen Test for SARS Covid-19.. (54119353)
Close up of doctor hands with protective gloves and PPE suit, showing a test device to senior patient. Review of a Rapid Antigen Test for SARS Covid-19.. (54119353)

Amanda Sullivan, of NHS Nottingham and Nottinghamshire Clinical Commissioning Group, said: "We are anticipating that the rates will continue to rise in our hospitals and we are adjusting our plans every day to mitigate the rising numbers.

"We are expecting more people to self-isolate with Omicron from an NHS staff side of things, so each day we will be reviewing to make sure that we are there for the people who urgently need the NHS."

Louise Lester, consultant in Public Health at Nottinghamshire County Council, echoed that message and revealed the latest figures.

She said: "Our rates continue to rise, and in the most recent seven days our average rate (in Nottinghamshire) is at 1,765 cases per 100,000, which compared to 1,250 cases per 100,000 the week before, so we are seeing a rapid increase.

"It is above the England average, and it represents over 15,000 people across Nottinghamshire who have tested positive in the last seven days.

"The rates are high across all of the districts and boroughs at the minute, with the highest in Gedling and the lowest in Rushcliffe."

Newark currently has 1,781 per 100,000, compared to Gedling and Rushcliffe at 2,036 and 1,751 per 100,00 residents respectively.

"All areas are very high, and it is still being driven by those aged 18 to 59, the working population," said Louise.

"We don't know what the new year will bring, but there is still the return of children to schools and students to university, people are starting to return to work, so it is likely we will see a rise in rates over the coming weeks."

Louise said it was important to wear masks, ensure good ventilation and test consistently.



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