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Old garages in Rushcliffe to make way for new homes in Metropolitan Thames Valley project




Old garages that are standing empty are to make way for new homes.

Metropolitan Thames Valley Homes (MTVH) is turning unused garage sites into new affordable homes for local people in Rushcliffe.

Working in partnership with Rushcliffe Borough Council, the housing association is working across six locations in the borough, demolishing 55 garages and one uninhabitable bungalow to build 23 new properties.

(l-r) Liz Beardsley, Policy Planner at Rushcliffe Borough Council; Cllr Roger Upton, Rushcliffe Borough Council’s Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Housing; Lisbeth Banner, Head of Delivery at MTVH; Karl Baker, Contracts Manager at MTVH (15665601)
(l-r) Liz Beardsley, Policy Planner at Rushcliffe Borough Council; Cllr Roger Upton, Rushcliffe Borough Council’s Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Housing; Lisbeth Banner, Head of Delivery at MTVH; Karl Baker, Contracts Manager at MTVH (15665601)

They will be built in Aslockton, East Bridgford, Radcliffe, Cotgrave, Edwalton and West Bridgford.

The homes include 16 for affordable rent ­— including six specifically for older people ­— and seven for shared ownership, a part-buy, part-rent scheme designed to help buyers on low to moderate incomes get on the property ladder.

The homes are being provided for residents in the borough, with the rented properties allocated to people on Rushcliffe Borough Council’s housing register.

The council’s cabinet portfolio holder for housing, Roger Upton, recently visiting the latest site to be completed at Marlwood, Cotgrave.

Mr Upton said: “We are delighted to be working with Metropolitan Thames Valley Housing in securing good quality affordable housing to meet local housing need, sustain jobs and improve the economy.

“The scheme here at Marlwood is designed to help residents with lower incomes to live in a property built to a very high standard.”

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