Home   News   Article

Subscribe Now

Newark and Sherwood: What you can do under the third national lockdown




Last night, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a third national lockdown starting from today, writes Elliot Ball.

The latest restrictions are just as tough as those imposed in the first lockdown and are set to continue for at least six weeks.

So, what can and can’t you do under this new lockdown and how does it differ from the previous rules?

Closed shop sign on Bridge Street. (43828691)
Closed shop sign on Bridge Street. (43828691)

Here is a list of rules for England’s third lockdown:

Stay at home

Similar to the March lockdown message, people have been instructed to stay at home to protect the NHS and save lives.

You can leave home to:

  • Get essential supplies like food or medicine
Close-up detail of a man shopping in a supermarket.
Close-up detail of a man shopping in a supermarket.
  • Go to work or volunteer if it’s impossible to do so from home
  • Exercise, which can be your own household or up to one other person from outside your household or bubble
  • Attend medical appointments, seek medical care or fleeing the threat of harm or violence
Young caregiver and senior woman.
Young caregiver and senior woman.
  • Provide care or help to a vulnerable person
  • For education and registered childcare, if a child is eligible to attend despite closures
  • People may also leave home to be with your childcare or support bubble, but are advised to keep it local

Other reasons you may leave the house include:

  • To provide emergency assistance
  • To be with someone giving birth
  • To visit someone who is dying
Caring nurse holding kind elderly lady's hands in bed.
Caring nurse holding kind elderly lady's hands in bed.
  • To visit a care home, hospital or hospice resident
  • To fulfil animal welfare, including going to a vet
  • To attend a support group (of up to 15 people)
Young male lying in couch during hypnotherapy.
Young male lying in couch during hypnotherapy.
  • To attend communal worship or life events such as weddings and funerals
  • To fulfil a legal obligation
  • To carry out activity related to buying, selling, letting or renting a property
  • To fulfil respite care where that care is being provided to a vulnerable person or a person with a disability

If for any reason someone leaves their house for a reason not deemed ‘necessary’, police will have legal powers to enforce fines and dispersal orders.

The latest information suggests fines will stay at the current level of £200 for a first offence.



This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies - Learn More